Music by: Rosie Malek-Yonan

Rosie Malek-Yonan Music

A Film by Ferran Barber – Music by Rosie Malek-Yonan

Watch Short Video Clip on Facebook:

Asirios. Cronología de la persecución más brutal jamás contada. Música compuesta por Rosie Malek-Yonan

[Assyrians. Chronology of the most brutal persecution ever told. Music composed by Rosie Malek Yonan.]

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Kerry Kennedy

It was such an honor and privilege to read posts on Facebook and Twitter from Kerry Kennedy who included me in Women’s History Month Spotlight. Thank you, Ms. Kennedy, for this unexpected recognition.

Kerry Kennedy is the President of Robert F. Kennedy Center Human Rights and the author of “Speak Truth To Power” and “Being Catholic Now.”

FB Mention Kerry Kennedy 12March17.jpg

Kerry Kennedy Twitter 12March17.jpg

To Wikipedia Editors & Biographers

March 7, 2017

It has come to my attention that a Wikipedia editor who goes by the named LouisAragon is at it again trying to change my Assyrian identity to Iranian on a Wikipedia Article about me and then proceeded to add me to various Iranian groups. There is no dispute and it is not up for discussion by anyone that my nationality was not, is not, and will never be Iranian. It is not for LouisAragon or anyone else to alter this reality or make misrepresentations as this Wikipedia so-called editor has been doing for a few years. LouisAragon’s obsession with me, verging on cyber stalking, is extremely alarming and Wikipedia needs to put a stop to it immediately, restore my nationality to Assyrian-American, and remove me from any and all Iranian categories, and groups on Wikipedia.

Article 15 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that Everyone has the right to a nationality, and No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.

My birthplace does not define my nationality. I am a U.S. citizen and I choose America as my home where I have lived much of my life.

So to all you so-called Wikipedia Editors and Biographers who continually try to alter my nationality based on your limited knowledge of who I am, just stop. 

Since Wikipedia has blocked me, and my representatives from making corrections to an article that is about me, I will post responses to its so-called editors here on my Blog, Twitter, Facebook Fan Page, and my Personal Websites. I will not be misrepresented and bullied by Wikipedia.

March 8, 2017 Update to My Post

Wikipedia’s all-knowing-so-called editor, LouisAragon, continues to argue/rant that he/she knows my nationality better than I (being the subject and primary source), assumes to know how many years I’ve spent in Iran and now further assumes to knows the birthplace of my parents to be Iran. Is this how these so-called editors contribute to Wikipedia? By assumption or bullying? Really? LouisAragon can best serve Wikipedia by refraining to inflict his/her views on biographies of living people. Perhaps this so-called editor’s skills should be exercised on biographies of the dearly departed. There’s bound to be less objections at least directly from the subjects of the articles.

NOTE: My next post Listen Up, Wikipedia will continue to develop and update  this post on Wikipedia’s Anti-Assyrian bullies.

/RMY

Merry Christmas!

 

Wishing everyone a very Merry Christmas

and if you celebrate other faiths,

I wish you a very Happy Holiday Season filled with love and peace.

The Crimson Field is available at  Amazon and The Crimson Field

Assyrian Martyr’s Day

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In August of 1933, the Simele Massacre would become the first of many massacres committed by the Iraqi government against the Assyrians of Northern Iraq. The systemic targeting of this Christian nation rapidly extended throughout 63 Assyrian villages in the Dohuk and Mosul districts resulting in the deaths of 3,000 Assyrians.

The Simele Massacre would also become the inspiration for Ralph Lemkin who would later coin the term “genocide.” In 1933, Lemkin made a presentation at the League of Nations Conference on international criminal law in Madrid. His essay on the Crime of Barbarity as a crime against international law was presented to the Legal Council. Based on the Simele massacre, Lemkin’s concept of the crime would later evolve into the idea of “genocide.”

Today, Assyrians around the world commemorate this event on August 7th as the Assyrian Martyr’s Day.

Akitu, Assyrian New Year 6761!

Happy Assyrian New Year, Akitu! 6761 years and still standing strong!

Akitu, is the Assyrian New Year Festival. In Assyrian it is also called Kha b’Neesan which translates into “the first day of Spring.”

The Akitu Festival began with the Sumerians. The word Akitu means “barley” in Akkadian. The Sumerian calendar had two festivals one in the Autumn beginning in the month ofTashritu in celebration of the “sowing of barley,” the other in Spring, beginning in the month of Nisannu celebrating the “cutting of barley.”

The Babylonians celebrated Akitu but only in Nisannu, a festival that lasted eleven days in honor of the supreme god Marduk and his crown prince Nabu.

The Assyrians also adopted the Akitu Festival when in 683 BC King Sennacherib built two Akitu Houses, one outside the walls of Assur, and the other outside Nineveh.

Modern day Assyrians continued to celebrate the festival but called it Kha b’Nisan, the first day of Nisan or Spring, however, it is usually observed on April 1st, which corresponds to the start of the Assyrian calendar. In recent years, the Akkadian name, Akituhas been re-adopted by Assyrians and is the most important national festival.

After the invasion of Babylon, the Persians adopted many Assyrian and Babylonian customs and practices. The celebration of Norooz (new day) on 21 March, has its roots in the Akitu Festival.

© 2011 Rosie Malek-Yonan. All Rights Reserved.

Fox News: Christians Persecuted in Iraq

FOX 11 News video report.

Published : Tuesday, 21 Dec 2010, 2:49 AM PST

Reporter: Christine Devine

Posted by: myFOXla.com

Los Angeles – Christians who live in Iraq are targets of terror, and becoming an endangered species. That’s the disturbing message coming from the Simon Wiesenthal Center, where leaders of many faiths came together to call attention to what’s happening.

On October 31st, suicide bombers attacked a Christian church in Baghdad, killing 68 people.

The Christian community says al Qaida has targeted them, and that the church bombing is the latest of many incidents.

Thousands of Iraqi Christians are leaving the country.

Rosie Malek-Yonan, author of The Crimson Field, the story of the massacre of Assyrian Christians a century ago, weighs in on whether history is repeating itself.

Related Articles The Christian Post and Christian Today Australia:

Faith Leaders: Stop Religicide of Iraqi Christians

Assyrian Christians will be among those minority groups that will not be free to worship as they choose this Christmas, according to Rosie Malek-Yonan, Assyrian activist and author of The Crimson Field, which chronicles events of the Assyrian genocide in Iraq.

“They will be playing a game of Russian roulette,” Malek-Yonan said. “They never know when they leave home to attend church if that is going to be their last mass, if that is going to be the last time they will leave home.”

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